Ill. David A. Glattly, Sovereign Grand Commander, Receives Award from The Chapel of the Four Chaplains

Chaplains_DG_Award.jpg#asset:116621David Glattly Awarded the Legion of Honor Humanitarian Award from The Chapel of the Four Chaplains at a ceremony at the Scottish Rite's Valley of Harrisburg, PA

Ill. David A. Glattly, Sovereign Grand Commander, Receives the Legion of Honor Humanitarian Award from The Chapel of the Four Chaplains

Ill. David A. Glattly, Sovereign Grand Commander, was awarded the Legion of Honor Humanitarian Award from The Chapel of the Four Chaplains at a ceremony at the Scottish Rite's Valley of Harrisburg, PA annual fall reunion. The award recognizes "persons whose lives model the kind of selfless service to community, nation, and humanity without regard to race, religion, or creed, so dramatically exemplified by the Four Chaplains." 

The award was presented by Lynn M. Chickering, a member of the Chapel's board of directors. In remarks she said, "To mark the sacrifice among Americans of every age and station of life, the Chapel established the Legion of Honor Humanitarian Award. It recognizes that no tradition in American society is more precious to, or characteristic of our culture than that of voluntarily reaching out to neighbors in need. Such selfless service is part of both our civic and religious heritage." 

Said Grand Commander Glattly, "I am humbled and take deep pride in receiving this award. The vision the the Scottish Rite of the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction is to always fulfill our Masonic obligation to care for our Brothers in need. I continue to commit my heart and soul to meeting that promise." 

Four Army chaplains were aboard the USAT Dorchester along with 902 men when it was torpedoed by an enemy submarine off the coast of Greenland on February 3, 1943. The chaplains were George L. Fox (Methodist), Alexander D. Goode (Jewish), Clark V. Poling (Reformed Church), and John P. Washington (Roman Catholic). Survivors report that the chaplains moved among the frightened men calming and comforting them. When the supply of lifejackets was exhausted, the chaplains removed theirs and gave them to the soldiers who had none. When the four chaplains were last seen, their arms were linked as they knelt together on the slanting deck and their heads bowed as each prayed in his one way to their one God. 

You can learn more about The Four Chaplains and the memorial foundation established in their honor here at this link