Celebrating Scottish Rite Legacies


The legacy of Freemasonry is built on stories of generations. Brothers have carried on the core values of our Fraternity to spread our mission of building men of character for centuries.

The legacy of Scottish Rite Freemasonry creates a special bond with our Brothers, and with the long line of Scottish Rite Masons who have come before us. This Fall, we are honoring and celebrating the legacy that is the cornerstone of our fraternity. Read below to be inspired by the touching Masonic legacy of Brother Lucius Crosby, 32°.

“I pray that I have been deserving of the honor of being a Mason and worthy of the confidence my brothers have reposed in me”

I am the 4th child of William E. and Alice H. Crosby. I was born on November 14, 1931 in Meridian, Mississippi, and grew up in the small town of Bonita wanting to be a Mason and a Veteran. I wanted to be a Mason because my dad, two brothers, and brother-in-law were Masons. I wanted to be a Veteran because both of my brothers and brother-in-law were Veterans of World War II and Korea.

Brother William E. Crosby, father of Brother Lucius E. Crosby
Brother William E. Crosby, father of Brother Lucius E. Crosby

In the summer of 1952, I was assigned to the 581st Maintenance Squadron of the 13th Air Force and stationed at Clark AFB in the Philippines. A few weeks before my 21st birthday, I wrote home saying, "Dad, I don't know what I'm supposed to ask, but do you think it's possible for me to be a Mason?" I wondered how and when I could join Freemasonry because I was in the Philippines, two thousand miles from home.

Several months later Senior Warden Alfred Adrian came by the shop to let me know that there was a lodge on the base and that the officers of the storied Leonard Wood Lodge #105 would be happy to confer the three degrees of Masonry as a courtesy to King Solomon #333 'Meridian Mississippi'.


Brother Lucius Crosby in his military uniform
Brother Lucius Crosby in his military uniform


The Lodge was one of the most beautiful buildings on base - as was the work done by the officers. My initiation passing and raising were in due form, receiving the Entered Apprentice degree on April 11, 1953, the Fellowcraft on April 25, 1953, and Master Mason on May 14, 1953.

There were no uniforms worn in the lodge and, having been advised of the base rules and regulations, I wondered if we were brothers outside the lodge. Several days later, my question was answered affirmatively when I saluted a major who returned my salute with a "Good morning, Brother." The major was Worshipful Master Richard N. Thompson.

There are four brothers of Leonard Wood Lodge #105 that I will always remember. Worshipful Master Richard N. Thompson, Senior Warden Alfred Adrian, my mentor, JW Dallas Tandy, and a giant of a man whom we all affectionately called Sgt. Bromley who always played third base.

Brother Adrian was Worshipful Master in 1954 and Brother Tandy in 1955. These four Brothers kept us busy and out of trouble with Craft team practice, filling the chairs, and outside activities. In the summer of 1954 when several of us were to return stateside, Worshipful Master Adrian held a banquet in our honor inviting all Masons, their wives, family, and guests.


My dad passed away in 1960 without the two of us ever sitting in lodge together. I made a promise that this would not happen were I to have a son interested in becoming a Brother.

In May 1997, Worshipful Master Mike Gigandet of Queen City Lodge #761 Clarksville, Tennessee graciously permitted me to raise my son, John. Now, he and his son Tyler are members of Edenton (Ohio) Lodge #332.

Brother John E. Crosby, son of Brother Lucius Crosby
Brother John E. Crosby, son of Brother Lucius Crosby
Brother Tyler E. Crosby, grandson of Brother Lucius Crosby
Brother Tyler E. Crosby, grandson of Brother Lucius Crosby


Today at 88, a Blue Lodge Mason for 67 years, a Scottish Rite Mason for 58 years, I can honestly say that I am proud to be a Mason. I have thoroughly enjoyed and feel honored to have been associated with Brothers whom I like, trust, and respect. Brothers who believe in God, love their families, are patriotic. Most are Veterans, recite the Pledge of Allegiance with feeling, help others, and live by the Golden Rule. They believe, like me, we are all brothers and sisters made in the image of the Supreme Architect, we read our Bibles and know that whatever our position in life, we are Brothers all.

I pray that I have been deserving of the honor of being a Mason and worthy of the confidence my brothers have reposed in me.