Celebrating Scottish Rite Legacies


The legacy of Freemasonry is built on stories of generations. Brothers have carried on the core values of our Fraternity to spread our mission of building men of character for centuries.

The legacy of Scottish Rite Freemasonry creates a special bond with our Brothers, and with the long line of Scottish Rite Masons who have come before us. This Fall, we are honoring and celebrating the legacy that is the cornerstone of our fraternity. Read below to be inspired by the touching Masonic legacy of Brother Joseph Flowers.

“I do often ponder what he would do if he were in my shoes. In doing so, I’ve become a better man of God, husband, father, and brother.”

“I became a Freemason, and now, mainly because of my grandfather, I’m a Brother of the Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction. The impact he had on me growing up as a child and young man was so profound that I wanted to emulate his character in every facet of life possible. One attempt to do this was when I decided to become a Freemason, and in March of 2008 I did just that. He, among others, was proud of me and, because of that, I knew I was on the right path.

About a year later, I enlisted into the United States Marine Corps, another trait that my grandfather and I share. He retired as a Master Sergeant in the Army Reserves, but he'd never make mention of the Army. All he would ever say is, "Five years, ten months, and twenty-two days," his time as a Marine.

Brother Flowers and his family at his military promotion ceremony
Brother Flowers and his family at his military promotion ceremony

My grandfather was very proud of his time in which he served and fought in the Korean War. At my promotion to Corporal, I was honored that he pinned me, which served to commemorate our shared passion of service. He has since passed, but I continue to reflect on the decisions he made in his life and how I can make similar decisions in mine. I was married with the same wedding band as he was, I drive his old Ford pickup, sit at his old desk, and one of these days I'll be able to rightfully wear his 32nd degree Masonic ring. I find his dedication to his wife, children, family, country, and God to be unmatched by anyone else I've met.


As another step towards mirroring his life choices, as of yesterday, I am now a Brother of the Scottish Rite, Northern Masonic Jurisdiction and although he cannot witness and experience this moment with me, I know he's proud. I've already registered for the October 24 and November 14 events to continue my journey, and I am anxiously awaiting an opportunity to become a 32nd degree Mason, same as my granddad. Now, to an outsider, it might seem a bit strange and almost obsessive to want to emulate another person to such a degree, regardless of relation or relationship. A completely understandable and reasonable opinion.

Now, I'm not walking around in the same trousers or wearing old ties of his (mainly for two reasons, I’m a bit taller and fashion has since changed). I'm what most consider traditional and enjoy sentimental things. For example, things like my grandfather and I sharing a moment on the tailgate of an old Ford pickup tipping back a couple of IBC Root Beers after working on the farm.

Brother Flowers working on the farm with his grandfather's red Ford pickup truck
Brother Flowers working on the farm with his grandfather's red Ford pickup truck

I appreciate things passed down with meaning and memories of happiness and joy. Even though I do not wear his dated shirts or trousers, I do often ponder what he would do if he were in my shoes. In doing so, I’ve become a better man of God, husband, father, and brother. The lessons he’s taught me are lessons I fully intend to pass on to my son, who is in fact named after my grandfather. That is the essence of a strong, resilient, and enduring legacy.